click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in sabine joining us on the telephone from italy. what more could you tell us on this announcement the pope will be resigning february 28? >> it appears the pope made the announcement himself but the information is very, very sketchy. of course, this is really big news. having a poker resign is something we have not seen for hundreds and hundreds of years. it appears the pope gave the announcement in latin. that is all we have a moment. we are obviously going to be following this story very closely indeed to see how things develop. >> i understand information just coming in, and very scarce at the moment. but any idea as to why he is going to resign? and why he has made this announcement? >> at the moment, we have no idea of whatsoever why he decided to resign and why he made the announcement at this time. we do not know if it has anything to do with problems he may have to do with his help. whether -- health. whether he believes the time has come for somebody else to replace him. whether there are some interior motives within the church hierarchy for this. at the moment, no motivation what
the new title pope emeritus. the vatican says he will continue to use his papal title rather than reverting to -- he will also have to change what he wears. the simple white people rope will remain. his ring and the papal seal, they will be destroyed and the new ones will be forged when the next pope is appointed. in a sign of changing times, he will also need to give up his twitter handle. let's speak to barbara. no more tweaking for benedict. i just wonder how much of a tweeter he was. >> not much of one, although he had a lot of followers. 1.5 million or just under 2 million, something like that. he has only tweeted a handful of times. i don't think that was a particular media success as far as the vatican policy goes. hopefully the next pope will also start tweeting again, possibly a bit more frequently. we while, this pope is engaged in his last duty as pontiff, beating the cardinals, really a last goodbye before he leaves the vatican -- meeting the cardinals, really the last goodbye before he leaves the vatican. he will be getting on a helicopter at 4:00 gmt, saying a final
they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items were all made by specialists who worked at the ancient maya city of copan. between a.d. 400 and 800, this magnificent city flourished as one of the major centers of maya art and culture. copan was built in a broad mountain valley on the western border of honduras. at its height, the economic system of t
. in to what he is saying. >> [speaking latin] >> st. peter's square, thousands of people in the u.s. are demanding a senior clergymen pull out of the forthcoming papal conclave, the meeting to decide who will be the next pope. cardinal mahony was the archbishop of los angeles with a series of child sex abuse -- sex abuse scandals took place. he is accused of covering them up. a group of priests in the u.k. is attempting to stop keith o'brien from participating in the conclave, for he is accused of having participated in an inappropriate acts going back some 33 years. going live to st. peter's square, paul is there for us. we can see the faithful have turned up for these vital papal prayers. >> 50,000 people flocking to the square, this week at think the official estimate is somewhere close to that 100, 150,000 people. the numbers are not just the devout and the faithful, but also the tourists and opportunists who realize the historic nature that this is the pope's final blessing here at st. peter's in rome before he steps down this week. the content is due to be a very brief one. he
and idealized, but are with us wherever we look. more than 200 years ago, when the founding fathers of the united states were building their new capital here in washington, they searched for a visual style which would embody their democratic ideals, and they found it in greece and rome in a style which for them, as still for us, embodies harmony, order, and freedom. the west has built its temples to liberty and justice and to money and power in the greek and roman style. you see it in trafalgar square in london and in leningrad in the soviet union. at the root of the western tradition-- in architecture, painting, and sculpture-- is the classical legacy. it's so ingrained in our way of seeing things that we don't notice when we use it in tv, commercials, magazines, coins, even on our credit card. many of our uses for it no doubt would astonish people from the ancient world. but if an ancient greek could be here now, he would recognize this around us and feel that, in some sense, the west is heir to his civilization. the power of this tradition and its hold over our imagination make i
capable of language, creativity, and thought. the differences among us lie in our cultures, our beliefs, how we organize our societies and how we make our living. humans have populated every environment on earth. we live on the frozen tundra and in the searing deserts. we live in thriving cities of millions and in isolated camps of a few dozen. some societies seem simple because they are small and their members are self-sufficient and use simple tools. others seem complex because they have large populations and people depend on each other for food and goods and use sophisticated technology. in between, there is a range that fills the spectrum. all of these differences are cultural, learned behavior, the result of a complex interaction between our inventiveness and our natural environments. as we search for new horizons, our inventiveness thrusts us across the boundaries of space, into new worlds. this new view of earth dispels an ancient myopia -- the artificial boundaries of our states and the politics that often divide us. here is a vision of one planet and one family of humankind. bu
>> this is "al jazeera." >> welcome to the news hour. it is good to have you here with us. coming up on this program, history in the making. south korea gets its first female president. thousands turn out for her swearing in. >> anger and pessimist mism in italy -- pesimism in italy. >> protests in the west bank after a prisoner dies in israeli custody. palestinians say he was tortured. fidel castro makes a rare public appearance in cuba despite the concerns he plans to retire. and red carpet ready. hollywood's biggest name for the most unpredictable oscars in the earth. >> we begin in south korea for the inauguration of the country's first female president has gun in seoul. you're looking at live pictures in the ceremony. there's increasing tension with north korea as she begins a five-year term. she'll also have to deal with the economic worries as the gap between the rich and the poor in south korea grows larger. harry foster is live in the capital. harry, what's been happening there? >> well, just many the last couple of minutes, pa krving enay has arrived here. as you can see
collecting is done by the finance police, the guardia de finanza. employees often used dubious methods when chasing down tax defaulters. the tax collectors work on commission. the more people they catch, the better for them. that is putting pressure on ordinary italians, especially small and medium-size companies. >> it was a spectacular protest against italy's new tax laws. the owner of a small beach bar scaled the dome of st. peter's basilica in rome and stayed put for some 24 hours. when he climbed back down, he was greeted by a cheering crowd. [applause] >> i really hope this tax issue is resolved soon and our small businesses as well as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are another weapon in the country's never- ending fight against tax evasion. the so-called financial police is seeking to recover an estimated 150 billion euros, and it is coming down hard on the country's culture of tax evasion. >> we are conducting stringent checks on luxury vehicles. if the income tax returns filed by
these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you read this number ? 21,000. you're getting these two a little mixed up from the example before. we earn our daily bread in offices, and we buy it in markets. but in many cultures, the household is still the most basic unit of society, where people spend most of their days, producing what they need to live and teaching their children their values and culture. anthropologist richard wilk. a household is an activity group. it's a group of
. it will be worse than this one. there will be more protests. i see instability. >> we hope for us and our children and the future we are better off. there are others behind us. >> the interim government of technocrats led by mario monti may have played a part in pulling italy back from the economic brink but it plunged the country into austerity, prolonging its worst recession in 20 years. boaters are now looking to the politicians to solve their problems. there are few promising answers. he looks at to win a shaky majority despite pledging to press ahead with austerity. it has at least pledge to pursue growth. there is no certainty that it will be able to govern with a free hand. its power potentially curtailed by a colorful cast of characters. in predictable fashion, berlusconi has already broken the silence impose some politicians at election time. >> they attacked me. it was based on nothing. nothing came of it. >> some may be won over by that. others will be enticed by the anti-establishment, anti- everything appeal from a comedian. with no experience in politics whatsoever. italy today, and
they died. tomorrow it will be us. >> pakistan's military and government do not seem to have a clear policy on fighting sectarianism in the province. a supporter once she is who have to leave.hiwants shias they refused to bury the dead in protest. the prime minister responded by firing the regional government and promising better security. that has clearly not happened. the government has been driven -- given 48 hours to respond to demands made by shia community leaders, who promise more angry leaders if they are -- protest that they are not met. saturday's attacks shows that those who want to target shias can operate in some parts of pakistan with impunity, despite promises made by the government. al jazeera, karachi. >> pakistan's interior minister says the government will protect the shia community. >> i have spoken this afternoon to the police. they will hunt those guys, wherever they are. it is coming from our shared enemy. we have started exercising control. there is some kind of a group from a broad which is broad which is broaan sponsoring them. if somebody is aiding them, we will
history of excavation "had such an amazing sight been seen "as the light of our torch revealed to us: "strange animals, statues, and gold. "everywhere the glint of gold. "we had seen enough. "we reclosed the hole, mounted our donkeys, "and rode home down the valley, strangely silent and subdued." brown: the discovery of tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 had an instantaneous and shattering effect on the world's imagination that continues to this very day. extraordinary numbers of visitors descended upon the tomb--sometimes to the point where the excavators were unable to function. egyptian motifs swept through the world of fashion and design. ashe whole worldthrilled t, death and the supernatural seemed to gin to prey upon the excavators. lord carnarvon died first--from the bite of a mere mosquito. as death closed over him in april of 1923, only a few months after the opening of the tomb, the lights of cairo extinguished with him. stranger still, at the same instant in england, s dog gave a terrifying howl and died. then georges benedite, the head of egyptian antiquities at the louvre museum
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)